“My 14-year-old son brought in the mail today & was quite disturbed & fascinated by a ‘gift’ Lands’ End sent us — a copy of GQ magazine with an absolutely OBSCENE cover!!!,” wrote one mother on the company’s Facebook page, which filled up with dozens of complaints. “I am appalled that Lands’ End — which I have always thought of as a ‘wholesome,’ family-oriented company — would be the one to expose my son to pornography!”
Another said: “We received your ‘Lands’ End Bonus’ of GQ magazine this weekend, and we are absolutely horrified. How can buying something as family friendly as school uniforms lead to soft porn in the mailbox? I’m thankful my son did not bring in the mail.”
Snapped another, “I ordered Christian private school children’s uniforms from your company and you sold my home address to a magazine company that peddles in soft porn for men???.”
— What happens when a marketer sells its list to the wrong publisher. I certainly hope these are joke comments - for the teenage boys’ sake,

“My 14-year-old son brought in the mail today & was quite disturbed & fascinated by a ‘gift’ Lands’ End sent us — a copy of GQ magazine with an absolutely OBSCENE cover!!!,” wrote one mother on the company’s Facebook page, which filled up with dozens of complaints. “I am appalled that Lands’ End — which I have always thought of as a ‘wholesome,’ family-oriented company — would be the one to expose my son to pornography!”

Another said: “We received your ‘Lands’ End Bonus’ of GQ magazine this weekend, and we are absolutely horrified. How can buying something as family friendly as school uniforms lead to soft porn in the mailbox? I’m thankful my son did not bring in the mail.”

Snapped another, “I ordered Christian private school children’s uniforms from your company and you sold my home address to a magazine company that peddles in soft porn for men???.”

— What happens when a marketer sells its list to the wrong publisher. I certainly hope these are joke comments - for the teenage boys’ sake,

If someone were to die at the age of 63 after a lifelong battle with MS or Sickle Cell, we’d all say they were a “fighter” or an “inspiration.” But when someone dies after a lifelong battle with severe mental illness and drug addiction, we say it was a tragedy and tell everyone “don’t be like him, please seek help.” That’s bullshit. Robin Williams sought help his entire life. He saw a psychiatrist. He quit drinking. He went to rehab. He did this for decades. That’s HOW he made it to 63. For some people, 63 is a fucking miracle. I know several people who didn’t make it past 23 and I’d do anything to have 40 more years with them.

I have reached peak Robin Williams - I’m sad but Facebook and Twitter is going overboard. This comment from a Daily Dish reader sums up my feelings almost perfectly. 

The persistent financial demands of Wall Street have trumped the informational needs of Main Street. For decades, investors wanted newspaper companies to become bigger and diversify, so they bought more newspapers and developed television divisions. Now print is too much of a drag on earnings, so media companies are dividing back up and print is being kicked to the curb.

Print Is Now Down, And Now Out by David Carr, who is also doing print obituary duties these days. 

I saw a faded old paperback of this story collection once years ago but not with this beguiling cover. Didn’t buy it. Apparently I needed that dollar badly. 
"He said as he kicked himself."

I saw a faded old paperback of this story collection once years ago but not with this beguiling cover. Didn’t buy it. Apparently I needed that dollar badly. 

"He said as he kicked himself."

These days, Mr. Sessums is trying to mount something of a comeback. Now sober, he took a job last year as the editor in chief of FourTwoNine, a new glossy magazine published in San Francisco by the gay and lesbian professional social network, dot429.com. Executives there say the magazine is a way to raise online advertising and help build an audience for the website.

Oh, for a time machine so this sentence could be read to publishing executives in the 90s. I bet they would understand maybe 20 percent of it.